R & E (1992): During years when there is a "crash" in the hare population (the primary food source on the breeding grounds for this species)
there is a mass movement of birds to the south.



R & E (1992): The falls of 1972, 1982, and 1983 are the recent examples of particularly impressive N. Goshawk incursions in the state. One of the earliest documented invasions in the state was during the fall of 1906 when 5 birds were shot between mid-Nov. and mid-Dec. (Widmann 1907).

Sept. 26, 1984 - Earliest fall record
(Adult); Tyson Valley RC, St. Louis Co.; Mark Peters, Jim Ziebol, Skip Russel; R & E, NN 56:78.



Dec. 16, 1972 - Highest winter single day count
(3); Kansas City Southeast CBC; Not listed; Not listed; Not listed; R & E. Followed a major movement of the fall of 1972.

Dec. 19, 1982 - Ties highest winter single day count
(3); Trimble CBC; Not listed; Not listed; Not listed; R & E.



R & E (1992): Most records for spring are concentrated around March. However, after a major invasion in fall, birds may be encountered
until early May.

March 25, 1973
(Female); Specimen (CMSU 328); near Osceola, St. Clair Co.; Observers not listed; R & E.

April 21, 1973 - Highest single day count
(5); Taberville Prairie CA and surrounding area, St. Clair Co.; Kelly Hobbs et al; R & E, BB 40[3]:5. Followed a major movement
of the fall of 1972.

May 12, 1991 - ~5th May record
(Immature); Farmington, St. Francois Co.; Bill Reeves, Bob Lewis; 5th Annual MBRC Report, 1991-23.

May 19, 1973 - Latest spring record
(1); Swope Park, Jackson Co.; Nanette Johnson, JoAnn Garrett; R & E. Followed a major movement of the fall of 1972.

R & E (1992): At least 3 additional early May records.



Note: Any significant observations since R & E will be added at a later time.



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